Sierra’s moustache shirt

It’s time to clear out the saved posts in my drafts and show them up here. I hope to get back to posting a little more regularly after a long hiatus. Even though I made this shirt last spring, now is the perfect time to revisit it. Sierra had mustache day in school last week, but insisted that she didn’t want to wear a mustache. No problem, child, you have a mustache shirt!

The shirt is store bought, and I made it using a freezer paper stencil. I found an image that I liked and printed it off. I transferred the image to freezer paper and cut it out. I ironed the freezer paper onto the shirt where I wanted the image to be.

moustache shirt

With the image in place, I used a stiff brush to apply fabric paint inside my stencil. In this case, I went for an ombre effect, so with each mustache, I added a little more white to my black fabric paint.

moustache shirt

When the fabric paint had dried, I went over with a layer of glitter because … glitter!

moustache shirt

The shirt turned out well, and the girl is happy with it!

moustache shirt moustache shirt

FINISHING something new

I’m so happy to have progressed all the way through trying something new to actually finishing something new.

The result of my first ever attempt at embroidery, the hoop I made for the Bee a {Modern} Swapper swap was sent off in the mail early this week.  It took me most of the month to actually finish it, but much of that was simply because I was having a stare-down with the partially completed hoop, not progressing only because I hadn’t done it before.  Once I actually achieved some forward momentum, it actually went pretty smoothly with just a few snafus that resulted in me cutting out my stitches and starting again.

The first part went pretty well because it was essentially quilting at the base, and I’ve done that before.  I traced the inside of my hoop and drew a hexagon.  I divided it so that I was left with six triangles, what I’m calling a split hexagon.

I used osnaburg for the base because it has a nice, natural color and a slightly nubby texture that I thought would work great with the bright colors I used for the triangles.

I matched a similarly colored embroidery floss with each of the triangles and this is where my project sat for a couple week.  I was paralyzed by what I didn’t know how to do next.  I got a tremendous amount of help from the embroidery picture tutorials at Rocksea when I finally started hand stitching.

I started out with a very basic running stitch around each of the triangles.  Above each triangle, I added a lazy daisy with 6 petals.  I wanted to use some French knots in the center and this is where things went awry.  My French knots were all weird and messy looking and coming out cleanly at all.  Frustrating.  I debated whether just to make it work, but eventually, cut them all out, reviewed the French knot tutorial, and tried again.

Much better!

Next up: leaves.  I decided to try a raised fishbone stitch, which resulted in a cute, fat little leaf on each side of my flowers.

To finish off the design, I drew some freehand swirls with my disappearing ink pen on each side of my flowers and used a back stitch to go over them in the color of the adjacent triangle.

Here, you can see all the stitches that I used for this project.

I finished the back with a piece of cardboard covered with batting and fabric.

Hope my partner likes it; I really put a lot of effort into this one!

April showers bring May flowers

I recently helped host a baby sprinkle (like a baby shower, but smaller in scale) for my friend Laura.  We didn’t go all out with a theme, per se, but my co-hostess and I tossed around the idea of “April showers bring May flowers.”  The shower was in April; Laura is expecting a little girl in May … makes sense, right?

Anyway, I put together a couple of do it yourself decorations to represent the theme.  The first was a raindrop garland, following the tutorial at Made.

It was beyond easy to make, and came together pretty quickly.  I took the various shades of blue out of a couple multi packs of felt sheets and stacked two together at a time.  I drew raindrops of various sizes on the top felt sheet and then cut them out.  After that, I just made a pile of mixed raindrops next to my sewing machine and grabbed them in a mostly random manner as I stuck them through my machine.

It is a little delicate since the thread between each raindrop is just polyester sewing machine thread.  This garland would have been stronger if I had sewn the raindrops together top to bottom, so felt was always touching felt without any open space between.  But, I wanted the raindrops to hang down in the same direction and not end up with upside down raindrops.  Or, I could have attached each hanging down raindrop to a stronger piece of ribbon or string that extended along the length of the garland.  Next time, perhaps, but you can keep that in mind if you make one.

So that covers the “showers” part of the theme.  You can see the “flowers” part of theme in  the raindrop garland pictures.  This was also a pretty simple project, and my 3-year-old even helped with part of it!

I think I saw this idea in Disney Family Fun magazine (could have been Martha Stewart), but for the life of me, I can’t find it now to confirm that, nor could I locate this project online.  Anyway.  I bought the flower shaped paper punch specifically for this project, and I could definitely see myself making this project again.  It was easy, fun, and turned out really great!

You’ll need:
A styrofoam wreath form
3 yards (depending on the size of your wreath) of wide ribbon
a length of ribbon for hanging
flower shaped paper punch
various colors of scrapbook paper or lightweight cardstock
pins (I used the jewel head kind with the pretty colors!)
scissors (to cut ribbon)

I started out by punching out a pile of paper flower shapes because I wanted all my materials ready to go.  If you prefer you could probably punch them out as you go to avoid having any extra flowers lying about.

I had … (ahem) … “help” with this step.

Next, prepare your wreath form by wrapping it in ribbon.  I started out by securing one end  of ribbon to the back of the wreath with 3 pins and then wrapping around them to hold it in place.  I wrapped it pretty snuggly, and just let the ribbon form little gathers as I went around.  When I had covered the entire wreath with ribbon, I simply secured the loose end to the back of the wreath with a few more pins.

Now, start pinning on your flowers.  Just stick a pin through the center of the paper flower and into the styrofoam wreath.  I started out using single flowers and then I realized that my flower punch was designed so that if I staggered two paper flower on top of one another, I had a perfect double flower.  So I took them all out and started again.  You could cover the entire wreath if you were so inclined, but I “artfully” (ha ha) left some of the ribbon exposed.

Then I made another one (but somehow failed to take a picture of it).  One adorned the door to greet guests as they entered the party.  The other decorated the mantle with the raindrop garland.  They were a great backdrop for Laura opening her surprises for her baby girl!